United Nations and the digital age for Mass Spying is there a solution? I would say yes

Posted on November 28, 2013

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Mass Spying is definitely a Human Rights Violation and off course many of us knew this, unfortunately companies care about the monetary cost and not the human cost. United Nations is waking up, but what about many of the innocent activists, journalists and innocent humanity who also need their digital end point protection? Is there a solution for many of innocent users of these technologies from an end point? I have to yes, only if companies started to look at solutions that are already in place…. speak to me and I will show you what some tech companies are doing to solve this from an end point for our devices.

United Nations DigitalAge Privacy @mymulticast

United Nations DigitalAge Privacy @mymulticast


UNITED NATIONS passed a resolution:
United Nations rights committee has unanimously passed a resolution on the “right to privacy in the digital age”. 55 countries, including France and Russia, co-sponsored the resolution.

The Third Committee of the UN General Assembly deals with social, humanitarian and cultural affairs. The resolution says that surveillance and data interception by governments and companies “may violate or abuse human rights.” It calls for the UN’s human rights commissioner to conduct an inquiry into the impact of mass digital snooping.

Revelations about the NSA’s surveillance program, a United Nations human rights committee passed a “right to privacy in the digital age” resolution on Tuesday. The resolution, co-sponsored by Brazil and Germany, two countries whose leaders were spied on by the NSA, states that “that surveillance and data interception by governments and companies ‘may violate or abuse human rights,’” Agence France Presse reports Press

Britain and Australia – which, along with the US, Canada and New Zealand, make up the “Five-Eyes” intelligence-sharing alliance – had pushed for its language to be weakened and lobbied successfully for one key component to be removed.

The resolution was supported by the US “after language that had initially suggested foreign spying could be a human rights violation was weakened,” Reuters reports Reuter The main point of contention, according to the Guardian, Guardian “was over language stating that foreign nationals should have the same rights to privacy as the citizens of countries carrying out mass surveillance. US law currently gives citizens far greater protection than foreigners from NSA operations.”

The resolution is expected to go before the UN General Assembly for a vote next month. The resolution, if passed, would be non-binding, but, as Reuters reports, “assembly resolutions that enjoy broad international support can carry significant moral and political weight.”

The resolution is expected to go before the UN General Assembly for a vote next month. The resolution, if passed, would be non-binding, but, as Reuters reports, “assembly resolutions that enjoy broad international support can carry significant moral and political weight.”

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