Communications Commissions of Kenya (CCK) said more than one million fake mobile handsets in Kenya

Posted on September 30, 2012

0


how did these fake phones get in the market FINAL @agemofanidea

how did these fake phones get in the African market  @agemofanidea  ” Kenya has confirmed that a switch-off of counterfeit mobile phones will take place at the end of the month. In addition, networks will be forbidden from activating new “fake” devices bought after 1 October.Government officials said the move was designed to protect consumers from hazardous materials and to safeguard mobile payment systems.They added it should also help them track users and limit violence ahead of March’s general election.The action had originally been scheduled to take place at the end of 2011, but was twice delayed to give subscribers a chance to replace their devices. However, the Ministry of Information and Communications has said this would not happen again.The government said three million users were using counterfeit handsets as of June 2012Official data suggests the country had 29 million mobile phone subscribers at the end of March 2012″
 

Communications Commissions of Kenya (CCK) said more than one million fake mobile handsets had been switched off on Monday October 1  when the exercise begun in  NAIROBI, Kenya

CCK acting Director General Francis Wangusi said Airtel had disconnected 740,000 handsets from its network, Safaricom 680,000, while Orange had blocked 75,000 handsets. yuMobile had not handed its data to the regulator by Monday afternoon.

Wangusi explained that the switch-off was to happen gradually to avoid technical hitches on the operators’ end.

“We are happy we have received cooperation from the service providers and I am sure before the end of business today (Monday), the exercise will be over,” Wangusi said.

“We deeply regret the inconvenience and anxiety that this exercise has caused amongst our customers. We realise that they have little to do with presence of these counterfeit devices in the country and it is unfortunate that they have had to shoulder the negative consequences of the same,” Safaricom CEO Bob Collymore stated.

“In order to mitigate the inconvenience we have been contacting all affected customers and providing them with the option of purchasing affordable genuine phones or redeeming their Bonga Loyalty Scheme Points for new handsets,”Collymore added.

He further called on the Government to reconsider the impending decision to impose VAT on mobile phones saying the move would make genuine mobile phones unaffordable to the majority of Kenyans and instead fuel the black market trading of counterfeits.

CCK says the number of the fake handsets maybe less than earlier estimate of 2.5 million, adding that many Kenyans have already replaced the handsets with original ones.

“We will issue a statement on the exact number and give a brief about the whole exercise. But we are happy everything is going on well,” Wangusi said.

“Those with their phones still on, and they are counterfeit should not celebrate because eventually they will go off and it’s for the good of this country,” he emphasised.

The switch-off, which also targets unregistered sim cards, is expected to affect the mobile phone money transfer services, resulting in loss of revenue and inconvenience to users.

CCK has, however, set a budget to meet the costs incurred by operators in effecting the switch-off, though the consumers will not be compensated.

By switching off the fake phones, CCK will be in compliance with the Kenya Information and Communications Regulations 2012, which requires all mobile phones to be type approved.

Contravention of this statute attracts a jail term not exceeding three years, a fine not more than Sh300, 000 or both.

All the four mobile phone service operators say that they are ready to effect the directive that all fake phones in circulation be switched off with effect from Sunday, September 30th. The operators are now calling for tough measures to be put in place to check against the distribution of contraband handsets in the Kenyan market. The market regulator the Communication Commission of Kenya, CCK is now mobilizing efforts to deal with electronic waste expected after the collection of the counterfeit phones  wow and this is truly also  becoming a dumping ground.

Subscribers using counterfeit mobile phones were told  no extension of switch according to the CCK website and Director General Mr. Francis W. Wangusi stated on Sept 19th  there would be no further extension of switch-off deadline for counterfeit phones.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

“Fake” mobile phones traders facing tougher reported on  September 10 2012 – question is how did these penetrate in Africa Kenya markets

who is responsible for bringing these fake phones and why are they being sold ? and  I am sure people are now affected by these… can we call this fraud and crime being committed human cost vs monetary cost? Mobile telecoms industry firm on switch-off of counterfeit phones…

The cut-off is expected to affect more than 3 million subscribers in Kenya’s rapid growing mobile phone industry …CCK  & their standards CSR – @ https://mymulticast.wordpress.com/2012/10/01/kenya-the-communications-commission-of-kenya-cck/?preview=true

SPECIAL REPORT BY XINHUA CORRESPONDENTS Bedah Mengo

NAIROBI (Xinhua) — Business persons in Kenya dealing with supposed counterfeit mobile phones are facing an uncertain future as the government readies to switch off all unlicensed handsets end of this month.

The traders are bracing for tough times in the coming months as they hold on to their stock, which mainly comprises of low-cost mobile phones.

Many of them are already counting losses as people shun buying mobile phones from them for fear that they will not use them once the switch-off is implemented.

Communication Commission of Kenya (CCK), which is currently running a public awareness campaign on the exercise, announced that it will cut off the cell phones from the four service providers in the east African nation on Sept. 30.

The regulator noted counterfeit handsets are hazardous and pose risks to Kenyans. The risks include emission of radiations that could affect health of users since the manufacturers of the mobile phones allegedly do not follow safety standard while making them.

CCK further argued the mobile phones affect network operations since they do not connect effortlessly.

Counterfeit phones are unable to connect seamlessly with network providers, leading to network congestion and dropped calls, “ noted the regulator, who blames the gadgets for rise in mobile phone fraud and other crimes in the east African nation.

 

Kenya’s Anti-Counterfeit Authority estimated the country loses 38.5 million U.S. dollars annually through tax evasion on sale of fake handsets.

The cut-off is expected to affect more than 3 million subscribers in Kenya’s rapid growing mobile phone industry.

And as some mobile phone users buy licensed handsets and others wait to see what will happen after the expiry of the notice, sellers of fake cell phones are pondering over their next move.

We do not know what we will exactly do with our stock since it is obvious that we cannot sell them in Kenya,” Gabriel Ngeru, who runs a mobile phone shop in River Road, a popular backstreet in Nairobi’s central business district, said on Monday.

For about two years, Ngeru has done brisk business as he sells the gadgets, especially to low-income earners.

The dealer specializes in the low-cost handsets, which have several features that include radio, camera, bluetooth and internet connection. Ngeru sells the mobile phones at between 17 dollars and 120 dollars.

Most people liked the multi-faceted phones because they were affordable. For about 40 dollars, one could get a handset similar to the one going at over 200 dollars in high-end shops,” said Ngeru.

The trader, as many others in the business district, opposes the move to switch off supposed counterfeit phones, arguing that some of them are genuine.

The mobile phones will be switched mainly because they do not have International Mobile Equipment Identity (IMEI) number, but this does not mean they are counterfeit,” he said.

IMEI number is a unique code used to identify original Global System for mobile gadgets. Mobile phone network operators, among other things, use the number to track stolen mobile handsets.

Ngeru said some of the phones that they sell will be switched off because they are manufactured by small companies, which have not applied for IMEI number registration.

Most of us do not sell imitations of Nokia or Samsung. They are low-cost mobile phones from small companies that do not apply for IMEI range from European GSM Association because it is not compulsory. This is one of the things that make the phones cheaper, “ he said.

In his shop, Ngeru has displayed a variety of low-cost mobile phones and related gadgets that include chargers, mobile phone skins and covers and batteries.

Most of the mobile phones I sell now are obsolete because of the impending switch-off. Since they announced that they are going to switch off fake cell phones, business has taken a downward turn, “ he said.

The trader recounted customers came to his shop and demanded to know whether the phone they buy will be usable after Sept. 30.

Some ask me to follow a procedure given out by CCK to find out if a mobile phone has IMEI numbers. I have done that for several customers and despite finding out that some of the phones have the number, they do not believe they are genuine,” he said.

Vincent Nasor, who runs a shop adjacent to Ngeru, noted the move to switch off fake handsets in the east African nation only favor big mobile phone manufacturers.

People are now going for phones from big companies because they believe they are the only handsets, which are genuine,” he said.

Ngeru and Nasor estimated they are going to lose 3,571 dollars and 2,900 respectively in terms of stock by the end of this month.

This is money that we had invested in buying the mobile phones. Some of it was loan and we have to repay,” Nasor said, adding that he is considering quitting the phone business all together.

And as they sell the phones considered fake, the traders are risking serving time in jail since according to Kenya’s laws, a person found with the handsets will pay a fine three times the value of the confiscated products or serve a five-year jail term or both.

.
Kenya’s CCK advise people on how
to verify genuine mobile phones

NAIROBI (Xinhua) — The Communications Commission of Kenya (CCK) advised people Wednesday on how to verify whether the handsets they wish to buy are genuine, following a recent notice from CCK to switch off over 3 million counterfeit mobile phones in the country after Sept. 30.

The CCK Director-General Francis Wangusi advised consumers to send the IMEI of the handset via SMS to 1555. “The response received from this system which has been set up in liaison with device manufacturers should be the only fool-proof yardstick for determining whether the handset is genuine or not,” Wangusi said.

Members of the public are also advised to purchase mobile phones from vendors who are duly licensed by CCK and should demand to see the CCK type approval certificate of the model of the handset they wish to buy,” he said.

The CCK is currently running a public awareness campaign on the exercise announced that it will cut off an estimated 3 million mobile phones from the four service providers in the East African nation on Sept. 30.

The industry regulator noted that counterfeit handsets are hazardous and pose risks to Kenyans. The risks include emission of radiations that could affect health of users since the manufacturers of the mobile phones allegedly do not follow safety standard while making them.

And the traders are bracing for tough times in the coming months as they hold on to their stock, which mainly comprises of low-cost mobile phones.

Many of them are already counting losses as people shun buying mobile phones from them for fear that they will not use them once the switch-off is implemented.

However, the director-general condemned a misconception in the mobile phone market that all handsets manufactured in China or by Chinese firms are counterfeit, which has sparked fears among Kenyans owning devices made in China, once after the CCK’s switch- off notice was released.

China has globally recognized companies whose products and solutions are being used worldwide by top operators, and which meet CCK requirements in respect to quality and type approval, said Wangusi in a statement released on Wednesday.

Chinese telecom firm Huawei has also confirmed the originality of their handsets.

Huawei has created a competitive edge by introducing original devices that ensure quality user experience at affordable costs for Kenyans at all levels, as a result of our heavy investment in customer centric research and development (R&D),” Wind Li, Huawei Kenya Representative Office CEO said in a statement.

As a global ICT leader serving 45 out of the top 50 global operators and a third of the world’s population, Huawei adheres to the laws and regulations of the countries we operate in while meeting all the product requirements,” he added.

Huawei has partnered with Kenyan operators such as Safaricom to bring smartphones in the market.

Safaricom has had a long standing relationship with Huawei whose technology ranks among the best in the world. The IDEOS was one of our first affordable smartphones and the fact that it became one of our best selling phones in the past year is testament to its quality and reliability in the Kenyan market,” Safaricom CEO Bob Collymore article first posted original source

Fraud, cyber crime, cyber threats and cyber dangers – the on going cyber issue ..fraud and crime tend to go hand in hand -sometimes we are truly not aware what is going on the other parts of the world -in the case of fake phones  in kenya -and were allowed to be sold in some of the African countries – it is a shock that operators will actually allow such fraud to take place – oh my god – it is truly about making money – and putting innocent people in a compromising situation  – and from an end point many of them may not have the right  and we all think we are all that safe when it comes to the cyber world – heck no

original source

Advertisements